Current PhD Students

I am always interested in hearing from students who would like to pursue PhD studies - please email me if you would like to discuss potential projects!

  

Nikki Lamb - 2014

The relationship between musculoskeletal markers and nutritional health in the transitional phase between the High and Late Mediaeval Periods in England.

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Email: 13131937@brookes.ac.uk

Twitter: @OsteoNikki

Blog: Osteonikki.wordpress.com

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My research is focused on the musculoskeletal markers [MSMs] of the Pelvis, Femur and Tibia, and how in combination nutrition, disease and habitual motion can effect bone structure at muscle attachment sites.

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Aims:

-    To explore the relationship between musculoskeletal markers in the lower skeleton and markers of nutritional health.

-    To investigate if lower limb musculoskeletal markers can be used to establish habitual activity patterns in High to Late Mediaeval population.

-    To establish if there is significant variation between musculoskeletal markers found in rural and urban populations and if any transitional patterning can be found.

-    To investigate if transitional populations show variation in musculoskeletal markers and skeletal traits that show change in habits and lifestyle.

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I hold a BSc. (Hons) in Forensic Science from the University of Kent and a Postgraduate Diploma in Anthropology from Oxford Brookes. I have worked for two field seasons on the El Hemmeh dig in Jordan run by the University of Kiel. [http://www.hemmeh-project.uni-kiel.de/]

I am a teaching assistant on the Human Osteology course at Oxford Brookes University.

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Sophie Edwards - 2015

A Comparison of craniomandibular ontogeny between fossil Hominoids of the Late Miocene and Early Pliocene epochs in relation to contemporary climate change and palaeoecological shifts.

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Email: 14101273@brookes.ac.uk

Twitter: 

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My research investigates how climate change and shifting environments affected the morphological evolution of the craniomandibular aspects of Miocene and Pliocene hominoid species. Before this, I read Archaeology at Leicester University. 

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I am a Fellow of the Royal Anthropological Institute and a member of the HOPE research group at Oxford Brookes. I have spent my spare time volunteering as an archivist at a local museum and offering my archaeological skills at fieldwork sites within Buckinghamshire and Leicestershire. 

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Publications:

Edwards, S. (2012) Analysis of Two Competing Theories on the Origin of Homo sapiens sapiens: Multiregional Theory vs. the Out of Africa 2 Model. 

Anthrojournal Vol. 1

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Edwards, S. (2014) Analysis of Late Pliocene Palaeoclimatography and the effects of Climate Change on contemporary hominin evolution.

Antrojournal Vol. 2

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Milly Farrell - 2015

The Lure of London: Immigrant social status and health in Post-Medieval London

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Email: 150567848@brookes.ac.uk

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My project incorporates the extensive skeletal collections of the Museum of London to assess patterns of health and social status amongst immigrant populations in the capital during the post-med era. Through assessing the literature from the period and cross-referencing this with the osteological evidence, I hope to form an understanding of the many ethnic minority groups living in London during this complex era, which saw major shifts in industry, culture and health. 

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My background is in museum collections, having been a collections curator for over 6 years; working at the Royal College of Surgeons, Natural History Museum London and the Museum of London. I have previously undertaken my own research using these collections and I am a strong advocate for using the many specialist museum collections across the UK in modern research. I have an MSc in Skeletal and Dental Bioarchaeology from UCL and a BA Hons in Archaeology from Newcastle University.

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Key Publications:

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Farrell, M., Rando, C. and Garrod, B., 2015, Lessons from the Past: Metabolic Bone Disease in Historical Captive Primates, Int. J. of Primatology.

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Farrell, M., 2013, Can Historical Specimens be Applied to Modern Research?, Primary Dental J., 2:4, 34-36.

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Farrell, M., 2013, A Case of Intentional Dental Modification: Assessment of a historical museum specimen from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Faculty Dental J., 4:4, 186-191.

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Farrell, M. and Williams, E., 2013, The Odontological Collection at The Royal College of Surgeons, British Dental J., 215:1, 41-43.

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Farrell, M., 2012, The Odontological Collection at The Royal College of Surgeons of England. Faculty Dental J., 3:2, 112-117.

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Farrell, M., 2011, An Overview of the Primate Research Collection at the Royal College of Surgeons of England. Primate Eye, 103, 51-52.

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Farrell, M., 2010, One hundred and fifty years of the Odontological Collection. Dental Historian, 51, 85-91.

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Farrell, M., 2010, The Odontological Collection at The Royal College of Surgeons of England: a short review. Bulletin of the Int. Assoc. Paleodontology, 4:1, 22-26.

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Farrell, M., 2009, Brief Communication: A Unique Dental Resource: The Odontological Collection at the Royal College of Surgeons of England. J. of Dental Anthropology, 22:3, 93-95.